Coho Red Raspberry
Coho Red Raspberry
Coho Red Raspberry

Coho Red Raspberry


  • This Coho Red Raspberry ships in a 1 Gallon Pot, min. 24" tall
  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way
Regular price $52.95 Sale price$47.65 Save $5.30
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Rubus idaeus 'Coho' - Coho Raspberry is a primocane red raspberry named after the Coho salmon that are renowned for their brilliant red body coloration and late spawning runs. ‘Coho’ has high yields of late-ripening large, bright red, very firm berries that are easy to pick. This large deciduous shrub grows in an upright manner and it although can benefit from trellises, is not necessary to support the structure.

Full sun to partial sun.

Attracts birds, bees and butterflies.

White flowers, non-fragrant.

Due to California Department of Agriculture, we cannot ship this item to the state of California.

Additional features: Disease Resistant, Attracts Pollinators, and Self-pollinating

This Coho Red Raspberry ships in a 1 Gallon pot.

Size: Mature size can reach up tp 5ft tall

Light: Prefers full sun (6+ hours of direct light)

Hardiness Zone: 5 - 9

Characteristics: Blooms late spring. Ripens June - September. If pruning is needed, do so after fruiting period has ended. Grows in an upright fashion.

Water & Soil: Fertile, well draining soil. Keep well watered during hot weather. Feed with slow release fertilizer in the spring.

Plant in spring or early fall to promote healthy root growth.

Best in well watered, fertile, well draining soil. Feed slow release fertilizer in the spring.

Mulch is great for retaining moisture but should be at least 4" inches away from the trunk to avoid bark decay.

Prune after harvesting season.

Allow 5' - 6'ft of space when planting for mature growth.

Plant care menu

Hardiness zone for this plant: 5 - 9

What's my zone?

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TriStar Plants

Coho Red Raspberry

Primocane type berries bloom and fruit on first-year wood and are often referred to as "everbearing" because they produce two crops on each biennial cane (unless pruned). The fall crop comes on current-season canes, at the top 1/3 of the canes. After overwintering, and if not pruned, a second crop will be produced in late spring to early summer at the bottom 2/3 of the canes. If a single but heavier crop is desired, all canes may be annually pruned to the ground before growth begins in spring. The new canes will produce fruit in late summer to fall of the same season.


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